Profiler 2.3

Profiler 2.3 is out with the following news:

introduced YARA 3.2 support
added groups for logic providers
added Python action to encode/decode text
added Python action to strip XML down to text
added the possibility to choose the fixed font
added color randomization for structs and intervals
added close report and quit APIs
exposed more methods of the Report class (including save)
– improved indentation handling in the script editor
synchronized main and workspace output views
– improved output view
– updated libmagic to 5.21
– updated Capstone to 3.0
– many small improvements
– fixed libmagic on Linux
– removed the tray icon
– minor bug fixes

Logic provider groups

Logic providers can now be grouped in order to avoid clutter in the main window. Adding the following line to an existing logic provider will result in a new group being created:

Encode/decode text action

A handy Python action to convert from hex to text and vice-versa using all of Python’s supported encodings. Place yourself in a hex or text view and run the encoding/decoding action ‘Bytes to text’ or ‘Text to bytes’.

The operation will open a new text or hex view depending if it was an encoding or a decoding.

XML to text action

Strips tags from an XML and displays only the text. The action can be performed both on a hex and text view.

And it will open a new text view. This is useful to view the text of a DOCX or ODT document. In the future the preview for these documents will be made available automatically, but in the meantime this action is helpful.

Fixed font preferences

The fixed font used in most views can now be chosen from the ‘General’ settings.

Struct/intervals color randomization

When adding a structure or interval to the hex view the chosen color is now being randomized every time the dialog shows up. This behaviour can be disabled from the dialog itself and it’s also possible to randomize again the color by clicking on the specific refresh button.

Manually picking a different color for every interval is time consuming and so this feature should speed up raw data analysis.

Report APIs

Most of the report APIs have been exposed (check out the SDK documentation). This combined with the newly introduced ‘quit’ SDK method can be used to perform custom scans programmatically and save the resulting report.

Here’s a small example which can be launched from the command line:

The command line syntax to run this script would be:

The UI will show up and close automatically once the ‘quit’ method is called. Running this script in console mode using the ‘-c’ parameter is not yet possible, because of the differences in message handling on different platforms, but it will be in the future.

Synchronized output views

The output view of the main window and of the workspace are now synchronized, thus avoiding missing important log messages being printed in one or the other context.

Enjoy!

YARA 3.2.0 support

The upcoming 2.3 version of Profiler includes support for the latest YARA engine. This new release is scheduled for the first week of January and it will include YARA on all supported platforms.

One inherent technical advantage of having YARA support in Profiler is that it will be possible to scan for YARA rules inside embedded files/objects, like files in a Zip archive, in a CHM file, in an OLEStream, streams in a PDF, etc.

The YARA engine itself has been compiled with all standard modules (except for cuckoo). Even the magic module is available, since libmagic is also supported by Profiler.

The initial YARA integration comes as a hook extension, an action and Python SDK support. The YARA Python support is the official one and differs from it only in the import statement. You can run existing YARA Python code without modification by using the following import syntax:

So let’s start a YARA scan. To do that, we need to enable the YARA hook extension. On Windows remember to configure Python in case you haven’t yet, since all extensions have been written in it.

When a scan is started, a YARA settings dialog will show up.

This dialog lets us choose various settings including the type of rules to load.

There are four possibilities. A simple text field containing YARA rules, a plain text rules file, a compiled rules file or a custom expression which must eval to a valid Rules object.

The report settings specify how we will be alerted of matches. The ‘only matches’ option makes sure that only files (or their sub-files) with a match will be included in the final report. The ‘add to meta-data” option causes the matches to be visible as meta-data strings of a file. The ‘as threats’ option reports every match as a 100% risk threat. The ‘print to output’ option prints the matches to the output view.

Since we had the ‘only matches’ option enabled, we will find only matching files in our final report.

And since we had also the ‘to meta-data’ option enabled, we will see the matches when opening a file in the workspace.

The YARA scan functionality comes also as an action when we find ourselves in a hex view. You can either scan the whole hex data or select a range. Then press Ctrl+R to run an action and select ‘YARA scan’.

In this case we won’t be given report options, since the only thing which can be performed is to print out matches in the output view.

Like this:

Of course, all supported platforms come also with the official YARA command line utility.

Since this has been a customer request for quite some time, I think it will be appreciated by some of our users.