Profiler 2.9.2 – Windows 10 Heap

The version 2.9.2 of Profiler is out with two improvements. The first one, is more or less a rewrite of the CCITTFax decoder for PDFs, which has now been tested against more samples.

The second improvement is the addition of support for the new heap introduced in Windows 10.

This removes the limitation mentioned previously of heap parsing regarding certain Windows 10 processes such as: smss.exe, csrss.exe, services.exe, lsass.exe, svchost.exe, MicrosoftEdgeC, etc.

As with the older NT heap we use an aggressive approach to rebuild the Windows 10 heap as best as we can even if there are missing pages.

The schema below shows the number of chunks found using an aggressive approach versus a soft one in a Win10 x64 image.

Profiler 2.9

Profiler 2.9.1 is out with the following news (entries with the plus sign apply only to the advanced edition):

+ added parsing of Windows heap
+ added file detection in memory regions and heap
+ added file detection in memory regions and heap via libmagic
added CCITTFax decoder for PDFs
added detection of DDE field codes
added support for 64-bit shellcode to executable
+ added display of page flags in hex views
added actions for text modification
added action to dump mapped PEs to disk
+ added signature for automatic recognition of EML files
+ improved identification speed of raw Windows memory images
+ improved loading speed of raw Windows memory images
+ improved scanning speed of memory images
+ improved global address space hex view
+ improved user address space view
improved fault tolerance of the XML parser
– improved CFBF support
– improved support of embedded OLE objects
– improved extraction of VBA code
– improved PDF decryption
– updated SQLite to 3.21.0
– updated libmagic to 5.32
– fixed XML to text action
– fixed Python multithreading issues
– fixed many small issues
– removed PasteBin action

We’ve waited for the official announcement of the new release, because we wanted to pack some more features inside 2.9.1!

After this edition, we will continue to release minor versions, while preparing a major 3.0 edition scheduled for the second half of this year.

Windows memory image identification speed

One of the main things we improved in 2.9 is the speed of opening memory images. The user has now the option whether or not to scan files in memory. Most of the times scanning files in memory is not needed and makes the opening of a memory image unnecessarily slow.

Version 2.9.1 comes with an additional very important speed improvement: the options dialog will pop up at the first occurrence of a valid KDBG structure. The user can still opt to look for additional KDBG structures as highlighted in the screenshot below.

Memory file detection via libmagic

The main addition in version 2.9.1 versus 2.9.0 is the capability to increase the file detection rate of files in memory using libmagic.

We can dump all files detected to disk as well.

While libmagic increases the detection rate, it also adds many false positive. A nice effect of using libmagic is the detection of text files and scripts.

Memory page flags

Page flags are now visible in the hex view for memory images. Not only when viewing the main address space of a process, but also when opening a mapped file.

Or the structures of a mapped file.

Or any children or resource of a mapped file.

Improved user space view

The user space view for every process now shows also the list of mapped modules.

Dump PE to disk

When inspecting a memory mapped executable, we can now dump the file to disk and Profiler will take care of adjusting the PE header in order to be able to inspect the file using external tools as well.

XML fault tolerance

The XML parser has been improved to handle incorrect XML files. This is especially important when handling PDF malware which contains malformed XDP data.

CCITTFax decoder

Yet another decoder has been added to our PDF support. Here we can see a malware sample using this codec to conceal some JavaScript code.

64-bit shellcode to executable

It is now possible to convert x64 shellcode to executable. In the past this feature was limited to x86 shellcode.

To handle x64 shellcode it is necessary to specify “AMD x64” as Machine.

Text modification actions

When being in the context of a text editor, we can now use text actions to do some basic text operations like converting text to lowercase or uppercase or removing spaces.

Enjoy!

Heap & File Carving

Along with the newly released 2.9 version of Profiler Advanced, we have improved support for memory images.

Before going into the main topics of this post, it is worth mentioning that loading and scanning times have been drastically improved for memory images. Apart from the important internal optimizations, the user is now given the choice of scanning or not the files in memory.

If the user chooses not to scan the files in memory right away (they are still scanned once individually opened in the UI), the loading process of the memory image takes only a few seconds if that.

One of the main news in 2.9 is the support for heap parsing for all Windows versions from Windows XP to Windows 10. The only limitation is that we don’t yet support the new heap type found in Metro/Modern applications. This new type of heap can also be found in certain Windows 10 processes such as: smss.exe, csrss.exe, services.exe, lsass.exe, svchost.exe, MicrosoftEdgeC, etc.

The heap of every process can be inspected in the UI.

It’s not trivial to parse a heap which might also be corrupted because of paged out memory regions. We put effort into parsing what is available.

You might wonder why the effort of parsing the heap in the first place. The main reason was due to a new feature introduced in Profiler 2.9, namely file identification in memory regions. Since we anyway wanted to identify files loaded in memory regions, we thought it was a good idea to try to identify files in the heap as well. Hence, the user can now enable file identification in memory regions and heap.

Of course, the user can inspect all the identified files in the UI. This for instance is an image found in the heap of the dwm process.

The user may also choose to dump all identified files to a specific folder.

The dump output is divided into directories, one for each process.

Each process contains one or all of the following directories and an info.txt file.

The info.txt file contains a list of dumped files and their respective names in the Profiler UI, along with possible errors:

We’ll further improve this feature in the next time, so stay tuned!

Windows Memory Forensics: Close to Release

We’re extremely proud to announce that the upcoming 2.8 version of Profiler Advanced comes with full-fledged support for raw Windows memory images! As few of our users might remember a two years old demo about this topic. Thanks to the work of the past months of our team, we could finalize that idea into a real product.

This is a hex view showing the user space regions of a process on Win8 x64.

We currently support WinXP to Win10 both x86 and x64. And, of course, the support for Windows memory forensics is available on all platforms which Profiler runs on: Windows, OS X and Linux.

Opening and exploring a raw memory image in Profiler is extremely simple. The first step is to open the memory image from the UI.

Profiler automatically tries to identify the correct Windows version and the user is presented with an options dialog, which allows modifications to the default parameters.

If the user decides to modify the parameters, he can verify the correctness of the results by exploring processes and other parts.

Once the users is satisfied with the configuration, he may press “OK” and let Profiler analyse the image. Once the detection and analysis of embedded modules and files is finished, the user is presented with the workspace.

In the workspace the user can explore executables loaded in memory (Wow64 is supported).

He may explore the PEB of a process.

Or its VAD tree.

The System Service Descriptor Table (SSDT).

The Processor Control Block (KPRCB).

And of course explore kernel memory and drivers as well.

As usual, once the initial analysis is finished, everything can be saved into a project along with notes, bookmarks, layouts and so on. Loading a memory image from a project is immediate and saves a lot of time when analysing the same memory image multiple times.

This is just the beginning: we have many ideas and expect to release more frequently than in the past. I’m sure, we’ll be able to pleasantly surprise you!

URL Download Action (Tor)

In the upcoming version of Profiler Advanced we have introduced a new useful action, namely the URL Download action.

Many times in previous posts we have analyzed some malware which at the end of its shellcode ended up downloading a binary from the internet and executing it. We thought it would be nice to give our users the possibility to anonymously download content from the internet in order to continue the analysis.

One way to download anonymously from the internet using our new action is via Tor. On Windows it’s sufficient to install and run the Tor browser.

The action will automatically try to load a possible URL from the current context, be it hex view, text editor or clipboard.

The dialog of the action offers different configuration settings: headers, user agent, download method (direct, SOCKS4, SOCKS5) along with relative parameters, anonymity check and also what to do with the downloaded content (either download it to file or preview it in a hex view).

Since we’re using Tor, we can either use the SOCKS4 or 5 method. We specify our local address and the port onto which Tor is listening for connections, in this case 9150.

The anonymity check is performed against our own https secured server: it will fetch the real IP by connecting to our server and then try to connect again via the secure method.

When the anonymity verification option is selected, before downloading the payload, we are asked by a message box to confirm the success of the anonymization.

If we click on OK, Profiler will then fetch the actual payload.

If we chose to preview the content in a hex view and decide later that we want to save it on disk, we can do so by selecting all the bytes (Ctrl+A) and then copying them into a new file via the copy menu.

EML support

The upcoming 2.7 version of Profiler Advanced introduces support for the EML file format.

Support for EML files had until now only been present as experimental hook to extract attachments. We have now introduced full-fledged EML support and have removed the previous experimental code.

It’s possible to preview the email messages:

Inspect their file format:

And, as expected, inspect their attachments:

The image above shows JavaScript contained in a PDF inside a Zip archive attachment, while the image below shows ActionScript3 byte code of a SWF contained in a PDF inside a Zip archive attached to an email.

Enjoy!

Profiler Advanced

With the upcoming 2.7 version of Profiler, we will start releasing an Advanced edition alongside the Standard one. All our users who have bought a license until this point in time will automatically have their license work with the Advanced edition for free. This is our way to thank you for your trust!

Apart from support for Torrent files, all features which had been in the Standard edition until now will be kept there. The Advanced edition comes with new features and is especially designed for experts in the forensic and security field.

Each new version of Profiler will come with new features both in the Standard and Advanced edition. We will launch the Advanced edition with an early-adoption price.